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Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 7 - 18
4217 Views:
Famous Early Failures Who Moved on to Great Things
From YouTube, produced by bluefishtv.com
This is a very motivating video that encourages students to learn from their failures. It does this by showing numerous very famous people who succeeded despite their early failures. (01:17)
Found by ronna_37 in Favorites
July 10, 2009 at 09:36 AM
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 13
4052 Views:
The Kingdoms of Life by StudyJams
From scholastic.com, produced by Scholastic
Scientists group organisms (living things) with similar traits together.  Kingdoms are the largest group, and there are five of them: plant, animal, fungus, protist, and bacteria.  Grouping organisms into kingdoms helps scientists understand the simi... [more]
May 14, 2011 at 11:43 PM
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 6 - 12
4111 Views:
Changes in Energy - Dams
From YouTube, produced by Phoenix Learning Group, Inc.
This video uses cartoon illustrations to show how energy is produced through the use of a dam. Color animation and narration. (01:39)
July 12, 2009 at 07:45 PM
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 8 - 18
3800 Views:
Sea Turtles
From pbslearningmedia.org, produced by WGBH
This video segment from Interactive NOVA: "Animal Pathfinders" examines the life history of the sea turtle, from its solitary habits at sea to its reliance upon beach habitats for breeding and egg-laying. This video is a great example of animal insti... [more]
October 2, 2010 at 11:30 AM
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 9 - 18
2179 Views:
The Nine Planets - Saturn
From YouTube, produced by mojo
This short clip (01:09) is an overview of Saturn and suitable for older elementary, middle school, and high school students.
Found by teresahopson in Planets
August 16, 2009 at 06:05 PM
Not Right For WatchKnowLearn
Ages: 12 - 18
4728 Views:
Lake Nyos Gas Density Demonstration
From YouTube, produced by Rod Benson
To avoid accidents, this experiment should be done by teachers in front of students, not by the students themselves. This is a great way to show students that carbon dioxide gas is heavier than air. It also helps them understand the unusual natural d... [more]
November 24, 2008 at 10:53 AM
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